The Art of Love is Good Business can be The Best Medicine

 

Using the Art of Love is Good Business

Love Helps in the Art of Medicine

This is the winning entry from our recent contest. The Best Medicine by Megan Gregor is so good we just have to share it and the wonderful things illustrated here about the philosophy of The Art of Love is Good Business blog.

From our perspective, this story is about Love as a well-spring of resources for delivering customer service above and beyond in circumstances that seem insurmountable. The story shows how Love informs our intuition, excites our creativity, and gives us the courage to go beyond our barriers to find answers.

Insight, courage, and humility all play a role in how Megan’s actions were successful.

Enjoy. And we hope you find inspiration in Megan’s story.

The Best Medicine

By Megan Gregor

I’m old so my story is old. Back when I was twenty six, I got a job as an adherence specialist for people living with HIV and AIDS. I was fresh out of grad school. I had no experience. I barely understood the job title. I was lured by the idea that I could help people who were really in need.

My passion to help others is part of who I am. It’s how I was raised and how I want to live; it’s what I teach my kids, and how I want to be remembered. I took the job to help people in need…but the problem was that they did not want my help.

This had not occurred to me when I took the job but it made a lot of sense when I thought about it. As adherence specialist, I was to go to all the public clinics, look at the records of med pick-ups, and determine who was not on track taking their meds. I was supposed to identify, reach out to, and problem solve with those individuals. The key to HIV/AIDS drug therapy is adherence. If you skip doses the meds become less and less effective. And at that time, there were only so many options for meds. If you wore them all out, then you had no options for treatment.

I tried a lot of intervention styles to reach out to my clients. They were a tough bunch because they were the noncompliant. They missed meds, and often appointments. It was hard to get a working phone number and harder to meet up. Once I’d get someone on the line or in a meeting room, I tried to explain the importance of the meds. I tried to identify barriers to their picking up meds: transportation, privacy, time off from work, mental and physical health problems. The lists were long. Progress was slow and difficult. There was a lot of backsliding.

I knew they saw me as a young whippersnapper who had no clue what they were going through. I think some met with me out of pity and others were bored. It was hard to break through this perception because I believed it was mostly accurate.

Then I had a brainstorm. I was really worried about a client who had kids and was living in an abusive home situation. She had no job, money, or car. It seemed like some of those things needed to be helped before I could really expect her to pick up and religiously take her meds. She needed a safe place. Yet she would not listen to my suggestions. My brainstorm was when I realized who she would listen to.

She didn’t need me. She needed peers. While I had sincere love and compassion for her situation, and for all of my clients, I wasn’t able to connect meaningfully. Once I could admit that, I worked hard to get approval, funding, and cooperation for what they did need.

They needed each other. A safe place to complain about: side effects, jilted lovers, the counselors, the system, the cruelty of fate. They needed to hear each other out and then offer reality checks. Their reality. Not mine.

What I did was connect the dots. In their lives, where was the money? The drug companies had the money. I wrote a simple grant to the pharmaceutical company that made the most popular of the HIV/AIDs meds. It was in their best interest to have clients take their meds accurately, thereby showing the efficacy. With the funds, I lined up a meeting place, staff (to be in the background providing info and security), and incentives like the occasional raffle, or attendance prizes.

I won’t bore you with the stats, but just having a place to go and talk helped their adherence rates rise. The correlation was strong. The more meetings attended, the more accurate the med pick-ups were. Meds, a support system, education, and case management were important to helping these individuals improve their adherence. But it was the love and compassion of their peers that made the biggest difference in their overall health trajectory.

As I mentioned, I’m older now and I haven’t had a paying job in a while. But the lesson learned has stayed with me. Being heard and understood with love and compassion can sometimes be the best medicine.

The End

    Bravo, Megan!


    To further explore the philosophy that Love is the best medicine, we recommend this newsletter article from Unlimited Love called Love Heals http://unlimitedloveinstitute.org/newsletter/giving-tuesday-2016-2.html.

 

Remember, together we can all make a difference that truly matters.

 

 


Congratulations to the Winners

 

Essay Contest Announcement of Winners

And the winners are:

1st – The Best Medicine by Megan Gregor

2nd – Un-rapped by Rich Lagomarsino

3rd – Working Happy by Kathy Quatraro

Honorable Mention – The Hospital Experience by Sheela Jaywant

 

All of the judges were impressed by the quality of entries. Thank you to everyone who entered and shared their stories.

 

Together we can make a difference that matters.

The Closing Date Approaches for our Essay Contest

 

Love: A Better Way to Work with People Essay Contest

Reminder for the Art of Love is Good Business Blog Essay Contest

LOVE: A Better Way to Work with People Essay Contest

Reminder: The closing date is Saturday July 30th, 2016 for our Essay Contest.

Remember that the submissions must be submitted as a Word document attachment to an email.

The response to our Essay Contest has been fantastic. Thank you to all of the writing websites and blogs who let people know about the contest.

We can’t wait to see what Saturday’s emails bring and we’re looking forward to reading all of your wonderful submissions.

Thank you to everyone who has already submitted!


Why do we call our Blog: The Art of Love is Good Business?

 

Art Makes Love in Business

There’s an Art to Love is Good Business

What’s Art got to do with Love in Business?

It’s really quite simple.

We discovered that bringing Love into the business arena calls for many of the key elements found in art: intuition, innovation, and adaptability. By using “Art” in our title, we encourage our readers to see the creativity needed in applying the idea of Love is Good Business. It’s about going beyond following a recipe to creating our own way to practice the use of Love in the workplace.

Getting to the point where we could appreciate that it’s the Art of Love is Good Business has developed over time. Four years ago we started our Blog with the title Love is Good Business and felt that was kind of risky. At that time, a search on the internet for “Love in Business” brought up only a few items before dissolving into something unrelated, and somewhat pornographic.

However, today, the idea that Love and Compassion leads to greater business success, isn’t strange or alien. Universities and Colleges have expanded their business degree programs to include compassion and Humanism. Books devoted to the subject crowd shelves. Articles on the internet are plentiful. People are really getting on the band wagon about the role that Love can play in business.

And we are very happy about this.

However, in all of this festive “get on board” energy there isn’t a lot out there about how to apply the idea; taking the idea from concept to application, and helping people use their Love every day, and in every situation.

We’re working at filling this gap by focusing on application. That’s why we seek out stories about how people have used Compassion in business settings to solve problems and meet challenges. And these stories aren’t just an exploration of how one person or team used Love and Compassion in business success. By sharing our stories, we can help each other see new and better ways to approach and solve our own challenges.

We believe that when we use Love in business effectively we unlock innovation, adaptation, and intuition in ways that echo the creative process of the Artist. We believe the stories shared here show how each writer brought their “Art”, their finesse and creativity to the use of Love in their workplace. This finesse and creativity are our writers’ artistic interpretation of what will work best in their environment and within their vision.

The Art of Love is Good Business is about the Universality of our individual ways of putting Love to work in our Workplaces, and about using the key elements found in art: innovation, adaptation, and intuition to do just that – harnessing the power of Love in the workplace.

Let’s harness that power together and make a difference that matters.


Love is Good Business by Patricia Carter

 

Dare to Care and Show You Care

Dare to Care and Show You Care – Love is Good Business

 

Love is Good Business?

I hear people saying, “You Can’t Be Serious!”

But I am serious. As a matter of fact, I’ve never really understood why this is such a difficult concept.

Let me tell you my story: As I moved up the proverbial ladder from worker bee to management I became very aware that relating to co-workers and my staff with a loving, caring heart wasn’t how things were done–especially in my line of work.

Since 2004 I’ve worked in treatment and supervision of the homeless and those involved in the criminal justice system.
It’s a tough job when you’re not wired to be the tough guy all the time. I seemed to be in a constant battle with bosses that believed being hard on clients and staff was the ticket to success.

But, listening closely in weekly conference calls when results were reported and issues discussed, I saw that my office and team did not have the same kind of issues. We had excellent results, one of the best in our state. And our office was bringing in new business. We had good relationships with county probation, law enforcement and other community partners. Our clients were doing good things and were involved in the community in positive ways. I had a great team who were focused on achieving great results.

Then, I went to my staff and clients and started asking questions. Interestingly enough, their answers were the same – they all said it makes a difference when someone cares what you think or how you feel. Staff said it made them want to learn and grow and do more. Clients said it helped keep them on the right path, especially when no one was looking. Maya Angelou said that people will forget what you say to them but they will never forget how you made them feel. This is so very true.

Caring or coming from a place of love doesn’t mean being a pushover. It means that you’re interested in the well-being of the people that work for you and the clients that use your products and services. It means saying “How are you?” and waiting for the answer, remembering a birthday or the fact that someone has a very sick family member at home. It also means that you clearly communicate your vision to your staff and make sure everyone understands what is expected of them. It means coaching, mentoring, disciplining and training people to move to the next level.

Great leaders (and bosses) care. They don’t assume, and they don’t allow ego to get in the way of developing staff and developing good relationships with those who do the work that produces results. You want great results and outcomes? Open that place in your heart that cares and see what happens. When you dare to care – people respond.

John Lennon was right – Love is all you need.

Author Patricia Carter has a passion for training and developing staff for excellent, positive outcomes and has been successful in creating an environment of learning and growth for the benefit of her teams and employers. She has over 10 years experience serving at risk individuals.

Enhancing Creativity With Love

Enhancing Creativity

When the ideas won’t flow, apply Love.

Creativity is an essential business skill. It brings the “ah-ha” moments—the insights to successfully deal with the day-to-day issues and challenges of performing our jobs. These insights close the gap between our ideals and reality, and move what “can be” into what “is”.

The problem with creativity though is that sometimes we feel it’s not showing up when we need it to.

That’s what happened to me when I was trying to decide what our next blog topic would be.

I was stuck. I couldn’t come up with a creative idea for our next topic. Any possibilities that did appear seemed un-inspired. But by applying the Art of Love is Good Business, a creative solution formed. What follows is a description of the process Arlen and I took.

[Read more...]

Defining Love for Business Success

Each of us sharing our experiences and thoughts about how Love leads to business success.

Under Construction – Love Defined

 

We updated our Love Defined page and wanted to share the current state of our understanding with you, our readers.

By sharing your insights and reactions, you become a part of this on-going journey of discovery about the nature of Love and its role in the success of business.

 

What do we mean by the word Love and what does it have to do with business success?

From our hands-on experience working in the business environment, we have come to the following explanation of Love and the role it plays in the success or failure of business organizations.

In its most basic definition:

Love is a heartfelt commitment to the well-being of a person, place, or thing.

It is the power that is released when we allow ourselves to truly care about what is good and wholesome for ourselves and others.

So what does this have to do with business? In the business environment, Love takes the form of real commitment to the Well-Being of the organization and its people, and the fulfillment of their mission. The presence of Love in the work place stirs authentic interest in customer happiness, the desire to help each other grow professionally and personally, and a passion for the success of the organization. [Read more...]

Hope and the Art of Love in Business

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While it is not all that apparent, what Dalai Lama shares here about hope is a key part of the ‘Art of Love is Good Business’.

When we look at our Life at work through the lens of Love, we can see hope we would otherwise not see. With hope we have the courage to look through the lens of Love. Love and hope are traveling companions.

When Love and hope shape the way we Live our Life at work, we build strength of character and joy; and a better way to do business.

 

“The very purpose of our life is happiness, which is sustained by hope. We have no guarantee about the future, but we exist in the hope of something better. Hope means keeping going, thinking, ‘I can do this.’ It brings inner strength, self-confidence, the ability to do what you do honestly, truthfully and transparently.”

dalai lamaDalai Lama

WHY EMPLOYEE OPINION SURVEYS ARE STILL ESSENTIAL WORKPLACE TOOLS

Surveys are great tools for mining the riches of information within employees; they will always be essential. Turning to employees to hear what they have to say is the first step of wise leadership and smart planning. However, there lies within the people of any organization much more than just raw information about where they are coming from that surveys retrieve. There is a treasure trove of passion, creativity, and courage to succeed that can be harnessed only through personal rapport and camaraderie; a deeper Human connection built on mutual trust and caring.
In this quality of work environment there is a team spirit that makes continuous improvement conversations an ordinary part of the work day and strategic tools like surveys soar in their effectiveness.There is an under lying attitude to this quality of team environment; one of caring about each other as Human Beings; dare I even say a Love for each other’s well-being as team mates. This is why ‘The Art of Love is Good Business’.
Arlen Pauler