Congratulations to the Winners

 

Essay Contest Announcement of Winners

And the winners are:

1st – The Best Medicine by Megan Gregor

2nd – Un-rapped by Rich Lagomarsino

3rd – Working Happy by Kathy Quatraro

Honorable Mention – The Hospital Experience by Sheela Jaywant

 

All of the judges were impressed by the quality of entries. Thank you to everyone who entered and shared their stories.

 

Together we can make a difference that matters.

Enhancing Creativity With Love

Enhancing Creativity

When the ideas won’t flow, apply Love.

Creativity is an essential business skill. It brings the “ah-ha” moments—the insights to successfully deal with the day-to-day issues and challenges of performing our jobs. These insights close the gap between our ideals and reality, and move what “can be” into what “is”.

The problem with creativity though is that sometimes we feel it’s not showing up when we need it to.

That’s what happened to me when I was trying to decide what our next blog topic would be.

I was stuck. I couldn’t come up with a creative idea for our next topic. Any possibilities that did appear seemed un-inspired. But by applying the Art of Love is Good Business, a creative solution formed. What follows is a description of the process Arlen and I took.

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Working with Difficult People is Possible with Love

Love is key to working with difficult people

Difficult people can be the key to success.

 

When we find useful content, we like to pass it on to our readers.

This article The One Technique to Get What You Want From Difficult People by Kate Matsudaira is worth sharing.

Kate encourages us to see what’s really behind difficult people and their behaviors by opening our perceptions to other possible motivations. Difficult people really are trying to help even when they contradict or disagree with us.

Her technique changes challenging meetings into collaborative and creative conversations. By bringing our Love to these conversations, we encourage “difficult people” to do the same.

Check out the article: The One Technique to Get What You Want From Difficult People
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You Don’t Have to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone – Expand It!

 

Feeling Exposed and Vulnerable?

Stepping out of our Comfort Zone can feel risky.

 

We’ve all experienced this:

We ask a co-worker or subordinate, “How are things going with that project/employee/problem or ___________________ (fill in the blank)?”

        “Fine,” he or she replies.

        But we know this is not the reality we see.

So why are we often reluctant to ask for help or discuss challenges we are facing?

Vulnerability. Exposure. Risk.

What it boils down to is: we’re not sure how to have conversations that discuss challenges, or ask for help, and still feel comfortable and safe. And, yet, it is these types of conversations in the workplace that will ultimately lead to break-through solutions that transform challenges into opportunities for success.
[Read more...]

How To Be Less Frustrated At Work

“Hunker down. Fight for what you believe in. Nine out of ten days are frustrating. But hang in. And along the way, never lose kindness and decency.”
Tom Peters
       First of all, frustration doesn’t have to hold you in its grip nine out of ten days.
       If you think about it, the frustration arises because we think we know what’s going on. The personal context we bring to any given situation determines the meaning we assign to other people’s actions. For example, if we have a pet peeve about cell phone use during meetings; that it’s rude and disrespectful; we have pre-determined the motivation of another’s action and set ourselves up to be frustrated.

Consider this scenario:

During an important budget meeting one of your department heads was late and is now busily texting away instead of participating. Questions directed to him are answered in mono-syllables. You observe the other managers casting frowns his way.  And you feel your own frustration level rising. “What is this jerk doing?” you ask yourself.

      Wouldn’t everybody feel less frustration if they knew the manager’s mother was in a hospice and he was texting with his wife about his dying mother’s condition? How quickly frustration can turn to caring, and perhaps, even a sense of admiration that the manager is trying so hard to handle his work responsibilities in the face of an impending death. Information leads to an opportunity to shift our attitude.
      With a new attitude of kindness and decency we can make a big difference in this situation. As the meeting leader, we would more likely call for a break to find out what’s going on, as opposed to making a harsh comment about texting or calling out the team mate. The break would give you an opportunity to talk to the manager and discover the underlying reason behind his, what was for you and the other attendees, outrageously frustrating actions. Compassion would further lead you to suggest that another staff member fill in so the department head can be with his wife and mother.
      In the philosophy of Love is Good Business, kindness and decency flow naturally from the Positive Regard we have for our teammates. Positive Regard for others creates a space for our frustration to be channelled in more constructive ways so we don’t say or do something that could be detrimental to our working relationships; or later make us feel inadequate. The practice of Love is Good Business lays the foundation to create openness and authenticity within the workplace encouraging teammates to be forthcoming and real about their internal world, or where they are, at any given moment. This, in turn, enables us to be more open in our support for each other.
      As we come from a place of Love for ourselves and others, kindness and decency naturally follow; so do wiser choices. A simple change of our personal context opens us up to the possibility that we don’t always know why somebody is doing something. Kindness and decency then lead us to find out what’s really going on and, ultimately, provides a way to lessen the number of days we are frustrated at work. 
      Would you share a story about a frustrating incident at your work place and what happened or what you wish had happened? 


 by Michelle DeLaBarre and Arlin Pauler