Why do we call our Blog: The Art of Love is Good Business?

 

Art Makes Love in Business

There’s an Art to Love is Good Business

What’s Art got to do with Love in Business?

It’s really quite simple.

We discovered that bringing Love into the business arena calls for many of the key elements found in art: intuition, innovation, and adaptability. By using “Art” in our title, we encourage our readers to see the creativity needed in applying the idea of Love is Good Business. It’s about going beyond following a recipe to creating our own way to practice the use of Love in the workplace.

Getting to the point where we could appreciate that it’s the Art of Love is Good Business has developed over time. Four years ago we started our Blog with the title Love is Good Business and felt that was kind of risky. At that time, a search on the internet for “Love in Business” brought up only a few items before dissolving into something unrelated, and somewhat pornographic.

However, today, the idea that Love and Compassion leads to greater business success, isn’t strange or alien. Universities and Colleges have expanded their business degree programs to include compassion and Humanism. Books devoted to the subject crowd shelves. Articles on the internet are plentiful. People are really getting on the band wagon about the role that Love can play in business.

And we are very happy about this.

However, in all of this festive “get on board” energy there isn’t a lot out there about how to apply the idea; taking the idea from concept to application, and helping people use their Love every day, and in every situation.

We’re working at filling this gap by focusing on application. That’s why we seek out stories about how people have used Compassion in business settings to solve problems and meet challenges. And these stories aren’t just an exploration of how one person or team used Love and Compassion in business success. By sharing our stories, we can help each other see new and better ways to approach and solve our own challenges.

We believe that when we use Love in business effectively we unlock innovation, adaptation, and intuition in ways that echo the creative process of the Artist. We believe the stories shared here show how each writer brought their “Art”, their finesse and creativity to the use of Love in their workplace. This finesse and creativity are our writers’ artistic interpretation of what will work best in their environment and within their vision.

The Art of Love is Good Business is about the Universality of our individual ways of putting Love to work in our Workplaces, and about using the key elements found in art: innovation, adaptation, and intuition to do just that – harnessing the power of Love in the workplace.

Let’s harness that power together and make a difference that matters.


Love is Good Business by Patricia Carter

 

Dare to Care and Show You Care

Dare to Care and Show You Care – Love is Good Business

 

Love is Good Business?

I hear people saying, “You Can’t Be Serious!”

But I am serious. As a matter of fact, I’ve never really understood why this is such a difficult concept.

Let me tell you my story: As I moved up the proverbial ladder from worker bee to management I became very aware that relating to co-workers and my staff with a loving, caring heart wasn’t how things were done–especially in my line of work.

Since 2004 I’ve worked in treatment and supervision of the homeless and those involved in the criminal justice system.
It’s a tough job when you’re not wired to be the tough guy all the time. I seemed to be in a constant battle with bosses that believed being hard on clients and staff was the ticket to success.

But, listening closely in weekly conference calls when results were reported and issues discussed, I saw that my office and team did not have the same kind of issues. We had excellent results, one of the best in our state. And our office was bringing in new business. We had good relationships with county probation, law enforcement and other community partners. Our clients were doing good things and were involved in the community in positive ways. I had a great team who were focused on achieving great results.

Then, I went to my staff and clients and started asking questions. Interestingly enough, their answers were the same – they all said it makes a difference when someone cares what you think or how you feel. Staff said it made them want to learn and grow and do more. Clients said it helped keep them on the right path, especially when no one was looking. Maya Angelou said that people will forget what you say to them but they will never forget how you made them feel. This is so very true.

Caring or coming from a place of love doesn’t mean being a pushover. It means that you’re interested in the well-being of the people that work for you and the clients that use your products and services. It means saying “How are you?” and waiting for the answer, remembering a birthday or the fact that someone has a very sick family member at home. It also means that you clearly communicate your vision to your staff and make sure everyone understands what is expected of them. It means coaching, mentoring, disciplining and training people to move to the next level.

Great leaders (and bosses) care. They don’t assume, and they don’t allow ego to get in the way of developing staff and developing good relationships with those who do the work that produces results. You want great results and outcomes? Open that place in your heart that cares and see what happens. When you dare to care – people respond.

John Lennon was right – Love is all you need.

Author Patricia Carter has a passion for training and developing staff for excellent, positive outcomes and has been successful in creating an environment of learning and growth for the benefit of her teams and employers. She has over 10 years experience serving at risk individuals.

Love is Great Customer Service

Great Customer Service

Employees serve up Love is Good Business

 

Here’s an interesting statistic:

Americans tell an average of 9 people about good experiences, and tell 16 people about poor experiences, according to an American Express survey in 2011.

So, we at ALGB want to buck the trend and tell you about a great customer service. Because this experience gives a real time example of what The Art of Love is Good Business looks like.

I wrote a letter to Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks. This is part of it:

Hello, Mr. Schultz.

 I wanted to tell you about an excellent experience I had at Starbucks in Boulder City, Nevada on September 28th.

 Even though my previous experiences with Starbuck’s Coffee had been disappointing because I couldn’t seem to get the kind of coffee I wanted, I decided to brave the Starbuck’s system once again. Your actions as CEO were a big reason for me to try again—you really seem to care about improving the lives of everyone your company touches. If I had not been aware of this, I’m not sure I would have pursued the kind of conversation I had with the associate who greeted me that morning.

 I approached the counter and explained to your associate that I needed help with ordering a coffee because I didn’t understand Starbuck’s menu. So, I just described what I was looking for: a weak coffee that’s sweet and creamy, with a touch of chocolate. Could she help me?

 She paused and thought for a moment, then enlisted the aid of the associate who prepares the coffee (do you call them baristas?). Between the two of them they came up with a coffee that fulfilled my wishes. And the barista wrote it down for me so I could order it next time.

 Now that’s a great customer experience. . .

 If the associates had not cared about helping me have what I wanted, the experience would have been very different, and maybe, more typical of a lot of customer/business interactions. I am grateful that my interaction with Starbucks was a kind and compassionate one.

 I trust you won’t mind if we expand a little on my Starbuck’s experience in one of our future blog posts. It was certainly for me, an example of the role Love can play in business success.

 I applaud your leadership and the people of your company.

 Thank you!

 Michelle R. DeLaBarre, Editor

The Art of Love is Good Business Blog

So, what went on in this encounter?

As a customer, I was aware that CEO Howard Schultz wants his associates to care about the customer’s experience. It seemed to me that I would be safe expressing my need; that I wouldn’t be a “bother” to the Starbucks’ associates, so I was brave enough to go “off the script” of a typical coffee ordering process.

And, sure enough, the associates were very responsive. They took my needs into account, and, ultimately, adjusted their actions to make my experience very satisfying.

I believe they also had a good experience too because they were given the opportunity to help, and were able to successfully apply their knowledge to create a happy customer in a real time situation.

We all parted ways smiling!

What great customer experiences have you had where The Art of Love is Good Business was at play?

 

Share your story so together we can make a difference that matters.

 

 

Power Up Business with Love

Power Up Business with Love

Power Up!

 

 

At the heart of our ALGB message is:

 Love is a practical tool for living a more wholesome and effective Life at work.

There is energy in Love that powers an array of Human attributes: courage, insight, physical and mental stamina, and empathy, to name only a few. With Love we can do things we can’t otherwise do. And that makes Love a practical and useful thing; not just a whimsical over idealized notion about how we wish Life would be.

But, how do we bring Love into our world of business?

Choice. Attitude. Intention.

We choose to care about the well-being of ourselves and others, and even about the well-being of the places we work in, and the work we do.

Once we choose to care about well-being, an attitude of Love forms. Now we put the attitude into action and guide our actions with our intention for well-being.

We intend to support the well-being of ourselves and others, and everything in our businesses.

The steps flow, and suddenly it seems easier to see, feel, and use Courage, Insight, Stamina, and Empathy.

And these Human attributes bring great results into our workplaces.

A real-time story:

A manufacturer had a rule. Orders needed to be shipped within 10 days. But a lot of things got in the way of meeting that deadline. And as the deadline kept being missed, the increased anxiety and fear levels made all of the delays grow exponentially.

As the manager observed the fallout from the missed deadlines, he became more and more concerned about the well-being of his staff, customers, and the organization as a whole.

He chose to care. He brought a Loving attitude, and because he intended to improve the well-being of all, he had the Courage to ask: What is a more realistic shipment schedule?

And from that courageous and insightful question, they built a better shipping process.

The employees felt less stress and the customers were happy. Together they had powered up their business with Love. That’s a win-win in any playbook.

And illustrates our closing thought:

Together we can make a difference that matters.

 

 


Love is Good Business for Every Business

Love is Good Business for Every Business

Love is Good Business is for Every Business in our World

Every business is about people relating to each other.

The Art of Love is Good Business is true for every business we work in, from the mega-corporation to the mom and pop corner store.

We were happy to see an article recently that shows that very point.

Here’s a quote from Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz.

“We’re not in a coffee business serving people. We’re in a people business serving coffee.”

This simple twist on how we think about our businesses helps build the framework we use to relate with our customers, vendors, co-workers, and each other; and, is a big part of what we hope we are sharing here.

To see this coming from the CEO of a large corporation is encouraging.

Read the entire article here:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/howard-schultz-giving-college-educations-his-employees-daniel-roth

Together we CAN make a difference that truly matters.

Using the Power of Love to Change Business

On Being a Compassionate Irritant

Speak up!

Speak up!

 

The opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it is conformity.
- Rollo May

 

One of the most important points we want to make in this blog is that Love is a Utility, a source of Power, to help support business and Human success.

We recently found ourselves talking about how being too agreeable, being too willing to go with the flow, can hinder positive growth and success. And, so, we wanted to share our thoughts about how being a Compassionate Irritant can help people be catalysts for positive change.

In some ways, it seems a paradox, this idea about being a Compassionate Irritant. When we are talking about the Art of Love is Good Business it might appear that we’re talking about rainbows and unicorns–fanciful and unrealistic stuff. That could be interpreted as “Peace at any Price”, or don’t be an irritant, or don’t irritate people.

Actually, Love is what enables us to be a very special kind of irritant. A Compassionate Irritant. Love brings an energy of caring enough about our work, and our fellow Human Beings, to power greater courage to be authentic and express our opinions and ideas.

Expressing ourselves as a Compassionate Irritant could start with something as simple as saying:

I could serve customers better if I had this. What do you think?

I don’t understand why we do things this way. Can you help me understand?

I have an idea. Can we talk about it?

And if that didn’t get anywhere, would we give up? Nope. We would continue to be a Compassionate Irritant. Because compassionately bringing up issues, ideas, and solutions, are the first step on the path to making things better in our world.

By initiating collaborative conversations from our place of Love we can Power positive growth and success for ourselves and the organizations we work with.

We encourage you to be a Compassionate Irritant.

Share a story or comment about your experiences with being a Compassionate Irritant.

Together we can make a difference that matters.


Dare to Care

“Caring can be learned by all human beings, can be worked into the design of every life, meeting an individual need as well as a pervasive need in society.”
Mary Catherine Bateson
In our busy work days it’s oftentimes easier to run away when a co-worker hints at a personal problem so we don’t have to deal with our own feelings when we hear what they have to say. But if we stop for a moment and show we care by giving our undivided attention, great things can happen:
The lead contract specialist sits at his desk, head in his hands. He is quietly weeping. In a courageous move, you pat his shoulder and sit down ready to listen to the problem. Once he has composed himself, he tells you his dog has died. It’s the dog in the picture on the credenza showing the contract specialist dressed in hunting garb, rifle angled in the crook of his arm, the dog sitting next to him grinning through the tangled feathers of a goose. You feel his pain because you care. And you listen to him recount the story of the picture. Maybe even tears spill from your eyes. In this moment both of you have established a deeper relationship—through the simple act of caring. The next time the two of you meet to discuss your disagreement over a procedure or goal, the link established earlier will form the basis of a respectful, open and productive  exchange.  
The fact is the line between personal life and work life continues to blur. As more people telecommute and work longer hours, spillover is bound to occur. As managers, we have to be aware that a depressed or angry attitude may be the result of something personal and not related to the workplace at all. This is where caring can have a great impact.
One of the reasons we are hesitant to show caring is our own fear; fear of embarrassing ourselves or others, fear of being misunderstood. This fear is the biggest factor to overcome if we are to really live a life where Love is Good Business. Taking that first step, as in the scenario above, leads to the compassion that creates openness and acceptance for all.
Will you share some of your actions that expressed caring and the results?