The Art of Love is Good Business can be The Best Medicine

 

Using the Art of Love is Good Business

Love Helps in the Art of Medicine

This is the winning entry from our recent contest. The Best Medicine by Megan Gregor is so good we just have to share it and the wonderful things illustrated here about the philosophy of The Art of Love is Good Business blog.

From our perspective, this story is about Love as a well-spring of resources for delivering customer service above and beyond in circumstances that seem insurmountable. The story shows how Love informs our intuition, excites our creativity, and gives us the courage to go beyond our barriers to find answers.

Insight, courage, and humility all play a role in how Megan’s actions were successful.

Enjoy. And we hope you find inspiration in Megan’s story.

The Best Medicine

By Megan Gregor

I’m old so my story is old. Back when I was twenty six, I got a job as an adherence specialist for people living with HIV and AIDS. I was fresh out of grad school. I had no experience. I barely understood the job title. I was lured by the idea that I could help people who were really in need.

My passion to help others is part of who I am. It’s how I was raised and how I want to live; it’s what I teach my kids, and how I want to be remembered. I took the job to help people in need…but the problem was that they did not want my help.

This had not occurred to me when I took the job but it made a lot of sense when I thought about it. As adherence specialist, I was to go to all the public clinics, look at the records of med pick-ups, and determine who was not on track taking their meds. I was supposed to identify, reach out to, and problem solve with those individuals. The key to HIV/AIDS drug therapy is adherence. If you skip doses the meds become less and less effective. And at that time, there were only so many options for meds. If you wore them all out, then you had no options for treatment.

I tried a lot of intervention styles to reach out to my clients. They were a tough bunch because they were the noncompliant. They missed meds, and often appointments. It was hard to get a working phone number and harder to meet up. Once I’d get someone on the line or in a meeting room, I tried to explain the importance of the meds. I tried to identify barriers to their picking up meds: transportation, privacy, time off from work, mental and physical health problems. The lists were long. Progress was slow and difficult. There was a lot of backsliding.

I knew they saw me as a young whippersnapper who had no clue what they were going through. I think some met with me out of pity and others were bored. It was hard to break through this perception because I believed it was mostly accurate.

Then I had a brainstorm. I was really worried about a client who had kids and was living in an abusive home situation. She had no job, money, or car. It seemed like some of those things needed to be helped before I could really expect her to pick up and religiously take her meds. She needed a safe place. Yet she would not listen to my suggestions. My brainstorm was when I realized who she would listen to.

She didn’t need me. She needed peers. While I had sincere love and compassion for her situation, and for all of my clients, I wasn’t able to connect meaningfully. Once I could admit that, I worked hard to get approval, funding, and cooperation for what they did need.

They needed each other. A safe place to complain about: side effects, jilted lovers, the counselors, the system, the cruelty of fate. They needed to hear each other out and then offer reality checks. Their reality. Not mine.

What I did was connect the dots. In their lives, where was the money? The drug companies had the money. I wrote a simple grant to the pharmaceutical company that made the most popular of the HIV/AIDs meds. It was in their best interest to have clients take their meds accurately, thereby showing the efficacy. With the funds, I lined up a meeting place, staff (to be in the background providing info and security), and incentives like the occasional raffle, or attendance prizes.

I won’t bore you with the stats, but just having a place to go and talk helped their adherence rates rise. The correlation was strong. The more meetings attended, the more accurate the med pick-ups were. Meds, a support system, education, and case management were important to helping these individuals improve their adherence. But it was the love and compassion of their peers that made the biggest difference in their overall health trajectory.

As I mentioned, I’m older now and I haven’t had a paying job in a while. But the lesson learned has stayed with me. Being heard and understood with love and compassion can sometimes be the best medicine.

The End

    Bravo, Megan!


    To further explore the philosophy that Love is the best medicine, we recommend this newsletter article from Unlimited Love called Love Heals http://unlimitedloveinstitute.org/newsletter/giving-tuesday-2016-2.html.

 

Remember, together we can all make a difference that truly matters.

 

 


Congratulations to the Winners

 

Essay Contest Announcement of Winners

And the winners are:

1st – The Best Medicine by Megan Gregor

2nd – Un-rapped by Rich Lagomarsino

3rd – Working Happy by Kathy Quatraro

Honorable Mention – The Hospital Experience by Sheela Jaywant

 

All of the judges were impressed by the quality of entries. Thank you to everyone who entered and shared their stories.

 

Together we can make a difference that matters.

Essay Contest

 

Love: A Better Way to Work with People Essay Contest

Announcing our Essay Contest

 

The Art of Love is Good Business Blog is running a writing contest

LOVE: A Better Way to Work with People Essay Contest

There are no fees of any kind to enter and win. We are looking for personal essays up to 750 words that share a true story about how Love and Compassion helped solve a work or business problem.

First Prize: $100

Second Prize $75

Third Prize $50

Deadline for submissions is July 30, 2016. Please check the rules at The Art of Love is Good Business.

Why do we call our Blog: The Art of Love is Good Business?

 

Art Makes Love in Business

There’s an Art to Love is Good Business

What’s Art got to do with Love in Business?

It’s really quite simple.

We discovered that bringing Love into the business arena calls for many of the key elements found in art: intuition, innovation, and adaptability. By using “Art” in our title, we encourage our readers to see the creativity needed in applying the idea of Love is Good Business. It’s about going beyond following a recipe to creating our own way to practice the use of Love in the workplace.

Getting to the point where we could appreciate that it’s the Art of Love is Good Business has developed over time. Four years ago we started our Blog with the title Love is Good Business and felt that was kind of risky. At that time, a search on the internet for “Love in Business” brought up only a few items before dissolving into something unrelated, and somewhat pornographic.

However, today, the idea that Love and Compassion leads to greater business success, isn’t strange or alien. Universities and Colleges have expanded their business degree programs to include compassion and Humanism. Books devoted to the subject crowd shelves. Articles on the internet are plentiful. People are really getting on the band wagon about the role that Love can play in business.

And we are very happy about this.

However, in all of this festive “get on board” energy there isn’t a lot out there about how to apply the idea; taking the idea from concept to application, and helping people use their Love every day, and in every situation.

We’re working at filling this gap by focusing on application. That’s why we seek out stories about how people have used Compassion in business settings to solve problems and meet challenges. And these stories aren’t just an exploration of how one person or team used Love and Compassion in business success. By sharing our stories, we can help each other see new and better ways to approach and solve our own challenges.

We believe that when we use Love in business effectively we unlock innovation, adaptation, and intuition in ways that echo the creative process of the Artist. We believe the stories shared here show how each writer brought their “Art”, their finesse and creativity to the use of Love in their workplace. This finesse and creativity are our writers’ artistic interpretation of what will work best in their environment and within their vision.

The Art of Love is Good Business is about the Universality of our individual ways of putting Love to work in our Workplaces, and about using the key elements found in art: innovation, adaptation, and intuition to do just that – harnessing the power of Love in the workplace.

Let’s harness that power together and make a difference that matters.


Why We Blog at The Art of Love is Good Business

 

Together We Make A Difference

Together We Make A Difference

We thought it might be a good idea to remind everyone why we started The Art of Love is Good Business blog.

We started The Art of Love is Good Business blog to support people looking for a better way to do business; a way that brings more meaning and significance to their Life at work and greater success for their organizations.

At the very heart of our message is this:

Love is a practical tool for living a more wholesome and effective Life. There is energy in Love that gives us the oomph to be brave, resourceful, compassionate, creative, and most important, wise. And applying Love to the business world makes our planet a better place.

We hope that others will find our blog useful as they go about making a difference that matters in their businesses and, by extension, in their lives.

Using the Power of Love to Change Business

On Being a Compassionate Irritant

Speak up!

Speak up!

 

The opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it is conformity.
- Rollo May

 

One of the most important points we want to make in this blog is that Love is a Utility, a source of Power, to help support business and Human success.

We recently found ourselves talking about how being too agreeable, being too willing to go with the flow, can hinder positive growth and success. And, so, we wanted to share our thoughts about how being a Compassionate Irritant can help people be catalysts for positive change.

In some ways, it seems a paradox, this idea about being a Compassionate Irritant. When we are talking about the Art of Love is Good Business it might appear that we’re talking about rainbows and unicorns–fanciful and unrealistic stuff. That could be interpreted as “Peace at any Price”, or don’t be an irritant, or don’t irritate people.

Actually, Love is what enables us to be a very special kind of irritant. A Compassionate Irritant. Love brings an energy of caring enough about our work, and our fellow Human Beings, to power greater courage to be authentic and express our opinions and ideas.

Expressing ourselves as a Compassionate Irritant could start with something as simple as saying:

I could serve customers better if I had this. What do you think?

I don’t understand why we do things this way. Can you help me understand?

I have an idea. Can we talk about it?

And if that didn’t get anywhere, would we give up? Nope. We would continue to be a Compassionate Irritant. Because compassionately bringing up issues, ideas, and solutions, are the first step on the path to making things better in our world.

By initiating collaborative conversations from our place of Love we can Power positive growth and success for ourselves and the organizations we work with.

We encourage you to be a Compassionate Irritant.

Share a story or comment about your experiences with being a Compassionate Irritant.

Together we can make a difference that matters.


You Don’t Have to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone – Expand It!

 

Feeling Exposed and Vulnerable?

Stepping out of our Comfort Zone can feel risky.

 

We’ve all experienced this:

We ask a co-worker or subordinate, “How are things going with that project/employee/problem or ___________________ (fill in the blank)?”

        “Fine,” he or she replies.

        But we know this is not the reality we see.

So why are we often reluctant to ask for help or discuss challenges we are facing?

Vulnerability. Exposure. Risk.

What it boils down to is: we’re not sure how to have conversations that discuss challenges, or ask for help, and still feel comfortable and safe. And, yet, it is these types of conversations in the workplace that will ultimately lead to break-through solutions that transform challenges into opportunities for success.
[Read more...]

Hope and the Art of Love in Business

cropped-Lone-Cypress-Cropped-3.jpg

While it is not all that apparent, what Dalai Lama shares here about hope is a key part of the ‘Art of Love is Good Business’.

When we look at our Life at work through the lens of Love, we can see hope we would otherwise not see. With hope we have the courage to look through the lens of Love. Love and hope are traveling companions.

When Love and hope shape the way we Live our Life at work, we build strength of character and joy; and a better way to do business.

 

“The very purpose of our life is happiness, which is sustained by hope. We have no guarantee about the future, but we exist in the hope of something better. Hope means keeping going, thinking, ‘I can do this.’ It brings inner strength, self-confidence, the ability to do what you do honestly, truthfully and transparently.”

dalai lamaDalai Lama

Dare to Care

“Caring can be learned by all human beings, can be worked into the design of every life, meeting an individual need as well as a pervasive need in society.”
Mary Catherine Bateson
In our busy work days it’s oftentimes easier to run away when a co-worker hints at a personal problem so we don’t have to deal with our own feelings when we hear what they have to say. But if we stop for a moment and show we care by giving our undivided attention, great things can happen:
The lead contract specialist sits at his desk, head in his hands. He is quietly weeping. In a courageous move, you pat his shoulder and sit down ready to listen to the problem. Once he has composed himself, he tells you his dog has died. It’s the dog in the picture on the credenza showing the contract specialist dressed in hunting garb, rifle angled in the crook of his arm, the dog sitting next to him grinning through the tangled feathers of a goose. You feel his pain because you care. And you listen to him recount the story of the picture. Maybe even tears spill from your eyes. In this moment both of you have established a deeper relationship—through the simple act of caring. The next time the two of you meet to discuss your disagreement over a procedure or goal, the link established earlier will form the basis of a respectful, open and productive  exchange.  
The fact is the line between personal life and work life continues to blur. As more people telecommute and work longer hours, spillover is bound to occur. As managers, we have to be aware that a depressed or angry attitude may be the result of something personal and not related to the workplace at all. This is where caring can have a great impact.
One of the reasons we are hesitant to show caring is our own fear; fear of embarrassing ourselves or others, fear of being misunderstood. This fear is the biggest factor to overcome if we are to really live a life where Love is Good Business. Taking that first step, as in the scenario above, leads to the compassion that creates openness and acceptance for all.
Will you share some of your actions that expressed caring and the results?