Pass It On – The Art of Love is Good Business

 

Pass it on - Love is Good Business

Pass it on – The Art of Love is Good Business

Part of our mission at The Art of Love is Good Business blog is to share the stories of others who have found that Love is truly Good Business.

Here is one such story from Alim Thompson.

 

LOVE IS NOT A COMMON TOPIC IN BUSINESS – IT NEEDS TO BE

  • Published on September 20, 2016

Alim Thompson

Business and Leadership Mentor, Visionary Entrepreneur, Global Networker, Former CEO

I have always loved what I do, and it has been a powerful force for my success. My love for what I do is so strong that I could not contain it even if I wanted to – and I don’t. That’s not to say it’s always fun and games and a bed of roses. But challenges are much easier to face, if you love what you’re doing.

I also choose to work with people I can love. I’m not talking about touchy, feely, but people I look forward to seeing and being with every day. Again, challenges are much easier to face if you love the people you’re facing them with. If you don’t love your spouse, your home life is hell. Same for your work life. You’re spending a good chunk of your life with your workmates. I have passed up many talented people for people with perhaps less talent, maybe not quite as smart, but people who would be a fit with me. This is how I have created loving, caring cultures, and have had people who have consistently gone above and beyond to fulfill the objectives at hand.

Many leaders don’t believe this is practical for routine, drone work. My first business was wholesaling which was mostly a warehouse operation. People loved working the routine warehouse jobs because they felt respected and cared for. They contributed many great, efficiency improving ideas. Turnover was very low for such work. Loving them was much more effective and efficient than lording over them with threats.

“All you need is love

All you need is love

All you need is love, love

Love is all you need” (Beatles)

 

We hope you found Alim’s article inspirational. Feel free to share with others. We did.

Remember, together we can make a difference that matters.

Contest Update

 

Contest Entry Thank You

Thank You for Your Contest Entry

Thank you to all of our contest participants.

If you did not receive an email acknowledging receipt of your entry, please let me know via email to  contest@loveisgoodbusiness.org.

We are beginning the review process now.

Good luck to everyone.

Michelle

 

Essay Contest

 

Love: A Better Way to Work with People Essay Contest

Announcing our Essay Contest

 

The Art of Love is Good Business Blog is running a writing contest

LOVE: A Better Way to Work with People Essay Contest

There are no fees of any kind to enter and win. We are looking for personal essays up to 750 words that share a true story about how Love and Compassion helped solve a work or business problem.

First Prize: $100

Second Prize $75

Third Prize $50

Deadline for submissions is July 30, 2016. Please check the rules at The Art of Love is Good Business.

Love is Great Customer Service

Great Customer Service

Employees serve up Love is Good Business

 

Here’s an interesting statistic:

Americans tell an average of 9 people about good experiences, and tell 16 people about poor experiences, according to an American Express survey in 2011.

So, we at ALGB want to buck the trend and tell you about a great customer service. Because this experience gives a real time example of what The Art of Love is Good Business looks like.

I wrote a letter to Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks. This is part of it:

Hello, Mr. Schultz.

 I wanted to tell you about an excellent experience I had at Starbucks in Boulder City, Nevada on September 28th.

 Even though my previous experiences with Starbuck’s Coffee had been disappointing because I couldn’t seem to get the kind of coffee I wanted, I decided to brave the Starbuck’s system once again. Your actions as CEO were a big reason for me to try again—you really seem to care about improving the lives of everyone your company touches. If I had not been aware of this, I’m not sure I would have pursued the kind of conversation I had with the associate who greeted me that morning.

 I approached the counter and explained to your associate that I needed help with ordering a coffee because I didn’t understand Starbuck’s menu. So, I just described what I was looking for: a weak coffee that’s sweet and creamy, with a touch of chocolate. Could she help me?

 She paused and thought for a moment, then enlisted the aid of the associate who prepares the coffee (do you call them baristas?). Between the two of them they came up with a coffee that fulfilled my wishes. And the barista wrote it down for me so I could order it next time.

 Now that’s a great customer experience. . .

 If the associates had not cared about helping me have what I wanted, the experience would have been very different, and maybe, more typical of a lot of customer/business interactions. I am grateful that my interaction with Starbucks was a kind and compassionate one.

 I trust you won’t mind if we expand a little on my Starbuck’s experience in one of our future blog posts. It was certainly for me, an example of the role Love can play in business success.

 I applaud your leadership and the people of your company.

 Thank you!

 Michelle R. DeLaBarre, Editor

The Art of Love is Good Business Blog

So, what went on in this encounter?

As a customer, I was aware that CEO Howard Schultz wants his associates to care about the customer’s experience. It seemed to me that I would be safe expressing my need; that I wouldn’t be a “bother” to the Starbucks’ associates, so I was brave enough to go “off the script” of a typical coffee ordering process.

And, sure enough, the associates were very responsive. They took my needs into account, and, ultimately, adjusted their actions to make my experience very satisfying.

I believe they also had a good experience too because they were given the opportunity to help, and were able to successfully apply their knowledge to create a happy customer in a real time situation.

We all parted ways smiling!

What great customer experiences have you had where The Art of Love is Good Business was at play?

 

Share your story so together we can make a difference that matters.

 

 

Balance Work and Life with Love

Work Life Balance

Balancing our lives–its easier with Love

Work Life Balance. This phrase seems archaic now with the steady blurring of the line between Work and everything else that is Life. But thinking about this imaginary line gives us the chance to look at how we do spend our time, and how we can spend it more successfully.

From our point of view, an attitude of Love always supports the best use of our time. When we can look at our work, our life, and our comrades with an attitude of Love our time is naturally spent acting in more wholesome ways, leading to greater success for everyone.

This article Work-Life Balance: Learning to Like and Live with Chocolate Milk by the guys at Fresh Milk from Contented Cows suggests some ways we can achieve these greater successes. And their suggestions are always well-grounded in an attitude of Love for ourselves and others.

For example, Bill touches on the value of “Me-Time”, and its increasing importance in an economy where everyone is taking fewer days off. We can help each other by addressing some of the downsides of taking “Me-Time”. What if we helped our vacationing associates by delegating or sharing their work so they don’t step into a back-log they feel they’ll never be rid of? Would this end up being a successful use of our time, as well as our associates’ time?

Read the article and catch some more ideas.

Together we can make a difference that matters.

 

You Don’t Have to Step Out of Your Comfort Zone – Expand It!

 

Feeling Exposed and Vulnerable?

Stepping out of our Comfort Zone can feel risky.

 

We’ve all experienced this:

We ask a co-worker or subordinate, “How are things going with that project/employee/problem or ___________________ (fill in the blank)?”

        “Fine,” he or she replies.

        But we know this is not the reality we see.

So why are we often reluctant to ask for help or discuss challenges we are facing?

Vulnerability. Exposure. Risk.

What it boils down to is: we’re not sure how to have conversations that discuss challenges, or ask for help, and still feel comfortable and safe. And, yet, it is these types of conversations in the workplace that will ultimately lead to break-through solutions that transform challenges into opportunities for success.
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